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Chem Soc Rev. 2011 Dec;40(12):5707-17. doi: 10.1039/c1cs15076f. Epub 2011 Jun 14.

Small-molecule discovery from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

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  • 1Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

Abstract

Researchers seeking to improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the bioactive small-molecule discovery process have recently embraced selection-based approaches, which in principle offer much higher throughput and simpler infrastructure requirements compared with traditional small-molecule screening methods. Since selection methods benefit greatly from an information-encoding molecule that can be readily amplified and decoded, several academic and industrial groups have turned to DNA as the basis for library encoding and, in some cases, library synthesis. The resulting DNA-encoded synthetic small-molecule libraries, integrated with the high sensitivity of PCR and the recent development of ultra high-throughput DNA sequencing technology, can be evaluated very rapidly for binding or bond formation with a target of interest while consuming minimal quantities of material and requiring only modest investments of time and equipment. In this tutorial review we describe the development of two classes of approaches for encoding chemical structures and reactivity with DNA: DNA-recorded library synthesis, in which encoding and library synthesis take place separately, and DNA-directed library synthesis, in which DNA both encodes and templates library synthesis. We also describe in vitro selection methods used to evaluate DNA-encoded libraries and summarize successful applications of these approaches to the discovery of bioactive small molecules and novel chemical reactivity.

PMID:
21674077
PMCID:
PMC4435721
DOI:
10.1039/c1cs15076f
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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