Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Hematol. 2011 Sep;90(9):993-1004. doi: 10.1007/s00277-011-1274-4. Epub 2011 Jun 14.

The impact of treatment, socio-demographic and clinical characteristics on health-related quality of life among Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Research Department, Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. s.oerlemans@ikz.nl

Abstract

Cancer survivors are at risk of experiencing adverse physical and psychosocial effects of their cancer and its treatment. Both Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) survivors face problems that can affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The authors systematically reviewed the literature on HRQoL among HL and NHL survivors. A PubMed and PsychINFO literature search for original articles published until May 2011 was performed. Twenty-four articles, which met the predefined inclusion criteria, were subjected to a quality checklist. HL survivors showed the most problems in (role) physical, social and cognitive functioning, general health, fatigue and financial problems. In addition, HL survivors treated with a combination of therapies, with older age and female sex reported worse HRQoL. NHL survivors showed the most problems in physical functioning, appetite loss, vitality and financial problems. Having had chemotherapy was negatively associated with HRQoL, but no differences in chemotherapy regimens were found. Furthermore, in NHL survivors not meeting public exercise guidelines, HRQoL is low but can be improved with more exercise. More research on the longitudinal comparison between HL and NHL survivors and healthy controls should be performed in order to better understand the long-term (side) effects of treatment on HRQoL and possibilities to alleviate these.

PMID:
21670973
PMCID:
PMC3150657
DOI:
10.1007/s00277-011-1274-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center