Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2012 Jan;6(1):52-62. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-2659.2011.00268.x. Epub 2011 Jun 13.

Quantitative review of antibody response to inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines.

Author information

1
Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. seidmanj@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Seasonal influenza epidemics are associated with significant morbidity and mortality each year, particularly amongst young children and the elderly. Seasonal influenza vaccines have been available for decades, yet influenza remains a major public health threat in the US, sparking interest in studies evaluating the effectiveness of vaccination.

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to identify determinants of serological responses to inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines including number of doses, adjuvant, and subject characteristics.

METHODS:

We reviewed 60 articles published between 1987 and 2006. We used weighted multiple logistic regression and random-effects models to evaluate how seroconversion and seroprotection rates varied with host and vaccine factors.

RESULTS:

Both children and seniors tended to have poorer immune responses compared to adults whereas use of adjuvant and a second vaccine dose tended to improve immune response. Pre-vaccination serological status had a large impact on the immune response to vaccination. We found substantial heterogeneity among studies, even with similar population settings and vaccination regimen.

CONCLUSIONS:

Future studies should stratify their results by pre-vaccination serological status in an effort to produce more precise summary estimates of vaccine response.

PMID:
21668661
PMCID:
PMC3175249
DOI:
10.1111/j.1750-2659.2011.00268.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center