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Am J Bot. 2002 Apr;89(4):559-65. doi: 10.3732/ajb.89.4.559.

Molecular mapping of the fasciation mutation in soybean, Glycine max (Leguminosae).

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  • 1The Interdisciplinary Genetics Program and Crop and Soil Environmental Science Department, Clemson University, 276 Poole Agricultural Center, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0359 USA.

Abstract

The spontaneous fasciation mutation generates novel developmental diversity in cultivated soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill. An increased apical dominance in the mutant inhibits axillary buds, causes a branchless phenotype, and restricts reproduction to shoot apices. The fasciation mutation is encoded by a recessive (f) allele at a single locus. The mutation, despite its importance in soybean development, has no locus assignment on previously reported molecular maps of soybean. A population of 70 F(2) progeny was derived from a cross between 'Clark 63' and the fasciation mutant. More than 700 molecular markers (amplified restriction fragment length polymorphisms [AFLPs], random amplified polymorphic DNAs [RAPDs], restriction fragment length polymorphisms [RFLPs], and simple sequence repeats [SSRs]) were used in mapping of the fasciation phenotype. Twenty linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the public soybean molecular map are represented on the Clark 63 × fasciation mutant molecular map that spans 3050 centimorgans (cM). The f locus was mapped on LG D1b+W and linked with two AFLPs and four SSR markers (Satt005, Satt141, Satt600, and Satt703). No linkage was found between the f locus and several cDNA polymorphic loci between the wild type and the mutant. The known map position of the f locus and demonstration of the mutant phenotype from early postembryonic throughout reproductive stages provide an excellent resource for investigations of molecular mechanisms affecting soybean ontogeny.

PMID:
21665656
DOI:
10.3732/ajb.89.4.559
[PubMed]
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