Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jul;41(1):17-23. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.03.012.

Support-person promotion of a smoking quitline: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology and Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. patten.christi@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Quitlines and other evidence-based cessation treatments are greatly underutilized by smokers, limiting their public health impact. Social support is correlated with successful cessation. Thus, efforts targeting the social network of smokers could be a potential avenue to promote quitline utilization.

PURPOSE:

This study examined the efficacy of an intervention for nonsmokers interested in helping a smoker (i.e., support people) to promote smoker utilization of the Minnesota QUITPLAN(®) Helpline. Data were collected from 2007 to 2010, and analyses were conducted from 2010 to 2011.

DESIGN:

Two-group randomized design evaluating the support-person intervention (n=267) compared with a control condition (written materials, n=267).

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

Enrolled were 534 support people (91% female, 93% Caucasian) residing in Minnesota.

INTERVENTION:

Written materials plus three weekly telephone sessions lasting 10-30 minutes each. Based on Cohen's theory of social support, the intervention provided participants with information and skills needed to encourage their smoker to call the QUITPLAN Helpline.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Participants completed the Support Provided Measure (SPM) by mail at baseline and Week 4 (end-of-treatment). Helpline intake staff documented smoker calls to the Helpline through 6 months of follow-up.

RESULTS:

The proportion of calls to the Helpline was significantly (p=0.012) greater for smokers linked to support people in the intervention group (16.1%, 43/267) than in the control group (8.6%, 23/267). The treatment effect remained significant after adjusting for support person residing with the smoker (OR=2.04, 95% CI=1.19, 3.49, p=0.010). Among support people randomly assigned to the intervention group, greater number of sessions completed was associated with increased smokers' calls to the Helpline (p=0.004). After adjusting for the baseline score, the M±SD SPM score at Week 4 was significantly higher for support people in the intervention group (16.4±3.3) than for those in the control group (15.3±3.6), p=0.002.

CONCLUSIONS:

A support-person intervention is effective in increasing smoker utilization of the QUITPLAN Helpline. There is potential for increasing the reach of quitlines by targeting the social network of smokers. TRIAL REGISTRATION #: NCT01311830.

PMID:
21665059
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2011.03.012
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center