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J Fluency Disord. 2011 Jun;36(2):110-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jfludis.2011.04.002. Epub 2011 Apr 16.

Changing adolescent attitudes toward stuttering.

Author information

1
EBS Healthcare, Alexandria, VA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Live oral or recorded video presentations on stuttering were delivered to high school students in order to determine the extent to which their attitudes toward stuttering could be improved.

METHODS:

A classroom teacher administered the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Stuttering (POSHA-S) to two health classes before and after an oral live presentation by a person who stutters. She also gave the POSHA-S to two other similar classes before and after a True Life(®): I Stutter video presentation. The stuttering person in the oral condition was one of three people featured in the video. Also, following the video condition, students filled out the POSHA-S a third time after a short oral presentation by the same person who stutters.

RESULTS:

Measured attitudes improved overall on the POSHA-S and on selected items.

CONCLUSIONS:

High school students hold similar attitudes toward stuttering and stutterers as adults, and these attitudes can be improved, at least temporarily, by a presentation on stuttering but more via a live presentation than a professionally prepared video.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:

(1) The reader will identify different ways to improve attitudes toward stuttering in high school students. (2) The reader will list advantages and disadvantages of live oral presentations and recorded video presentations as strategies to change attitudes toward stuttering. (3) The reader will identify characteristics of a speaker that can assist in attitude changes of high school students.

PMID:
21664529
DOI:
10.1016/j.jfludis.2011.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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