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Virol J. 2011 Jun 9;8:288. doi: 10.1186/1743-422X-8-288.

Longitudinal molecular microbial analysis of influenza-like illness in New York City, May 2009 through May 2010.

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1
Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA. rt2249@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We performed a longitudinal study of viral etiology in samples collected in New York City during May 2009 to May 2010 from outpatients with fever or respiratory disease symptoms in the context of a pilot respiratory virus surveillance system.

METHODS:

Samples were assessed for the presence of 13 viruses, including influenza A virus, by MassTag PCR.

RESULTS:

At least one virus was detected in 52% of 940 samples analyzed, with 3% showing co-infections. The most frequently detected agents were rhinoviruses and influenza A, all representing the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain. The incidence of influenza H1N1-positive samples was highest in late spring 2009, followed by a decline in summer and early fall, when rhinovirus infections became predominant before H1N1 reemerged in winter. Our study also identified a focal outbreak of enterovirus 68 in the early fall of 2009.

CONCLUSION:

MassTag multiplex PCR affords opportunities to track the epidemiology of infectious diseases and may guide clinicians and public health practitioners in influenza-like illness and outbreak management. Nonetheless, a substantial proportion of influenza-like illness remains unexplained underscoring the need for additional platforms.

PMID:
21658237
PMCID:
PMC3121709
DOI:
10.1186/1743-422X-8-288
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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