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Dis Colon Rectum. 2011 Jul;54(7):887-94. doi: 10.1007/DCR.0b013e3182125577.

Inverse relationship between moderate alcohol intake and rectal cancer: analysis of the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. seth_crockett@med.unc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between alcohol intake and rectal cancer is uncertain.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to evaluate whether alcohol consumption is associated with distal colorectal cancer and rectal cancer specifically.

DESIGN:

Data on alcohol intake were examined from the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of distal colorectal cancer.

SETTING:

This study encompassed 33 counties in the central and eastern part of North Carolina.

PATIENTS:

Cases had adenocarcinoma of the rectum, rectosigmoid, and sigmoid colon. Controls were frequency-matched on age, race, and sex.

INTERVENTIONS:

Demographic and dietary intake data were collected with use of a validated questionnaire.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for the relationship between alcohol consumption and distal colorectal cancer.

RESULTS:

Included in the study were 1033 cases and 1011 controls. The odds ratio for rectal cancer comparing any vs no alcohol intake was 0.73 (95% CI 0.60, 0.90), adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking status, obesity, education, red meat intake, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, and family history of colorectal cancer. The odds ratio for moderate alcohol (≤14 g/day) was 0.66 (95% CI 0.53, 0.82), whereas the odds ratio for heavy alcohol (>14 g/day) was 0.93 (95% CI 0.70, 1.23). Moderate beer and wine intakes were also inversely associated with distal colorectal cancer: odds ratios 0.76 (95% CI 0.60, 0.96) and 0.69 (95% CI 0.56, 0.86).

LIMITATIONS:

This was a retrospective, observational study. Residual confounding is possible.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this study, moderate alcohol intake (especially wine) was inversely associated with distal colorectal cancer.

PMID:
21654257
PMCID:
PMC3111915
DOI:
10.1007/DCR.0b013e3182125577
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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