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Cogn Psychol. 2011 Aug;63(1):1-33. doi: 10.1016/j.cogpsych.2011.05.001. Epub 2011 Jun 7.

Is comprehension necessary for error detection? A conflict-based account of monitoring in speech production.

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1
Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 N. Matthews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801, USA. nnozari2@illinois.edu

Abstract

Despite the existence of speech errors, verbal communication is successful because speakers can detect (and correct) their errors. The standard theory of speech-error detection, the perceptual-loop account, posits that the comprehension system monitors production output for errors. Such a comprehension-based monitor, however, cannot explain the double dissociation between comprehension and error-detection ability observed in the aphasic patients. We propose a new theory of speech-error detection which is instead based on the production process itself. The theory borrows from studies of forced-choice-response tasks the notion that error detection is accomplished by monitoring response conflict via a frontal brain structure, such as the anterior cingulate cortex. We adapt this idea to the two-step model of word production, and test the model-derived predictions on a sample of aphasic patients. Our results show a strong correlation between patients' error-detection ability and the model's characterization of their production skills, and no significant correlation between error detection and comprehension measures, thus supporting a production-based monitor, generally, and the implemented conflict-based monitor in particular. The successful application of the conflict-based theory to error-detection in linguistic, as well as non-linguistic domains points to a domain-general monitoring system.

PMID:
21652015
PMCID:
PMC3135428
DOI:
10.1016/j.cogpsych.2011.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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