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Haemophilia. 2012 Jan;18(1):86-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2516.2011.02579.x. Epub 2011 Jun 7.

Clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction following total joint replacement in haemophilia--23-year experience in knees, hips and elbows.

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1
Orthopaedic SurgeryHaematology, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Vic, Australia. kemble.wang@gmail.com

Abstract

Joint replacement surgery is an available option for end-stage haemophilic arthropathy. However, reports with long-term follow-up are limited. Moreover, patient satisfaction in this setting has never been measured. We share our institution's experience with joint arthroplasty in haemophilic arthropathy and report on clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Between 1985 and 2007, 65 consecutive joints in 45 patients (mean age: 48.6; range: 22-83) underwent joint replacement surgery. Of these, 40 total knee replacements in 31 patients, 18 total hip replacements in 16 patients and 6 total elbow replacements in 3 patients were included. Average follow-up was 10.7 years (2.4-24.3). Charts were reviewed retrospectively and patients were asked to return for clinical assessment and completion of questionnaires. According to the Knee Society clinical score, postoperative results were good to excellent in 83% of knees. According to the Harris Hip Score, results were good to excellent in 31% of hips. According to the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, results were good to excellent in 83% of elbows. Complication rates are higher than in the non-haemophilic population, while prosthesis survival rates are lower. Patient satisfaction with pain relief is higher than satisfaction with functional improvement. For 88% of joints, patients are willing to have the same operation again. This study confirms previous knowledge on the role of total joint arthroplasty in haemophilic arthropathy. Despite high complication rates and modest functional outcomes, the operations are valuable for achieving pain relief. In general, patients find that risks are outweighed by the benefits.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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