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Br J Surg. 2011 Oct;98(10):1414-21. doi: 10.1002/bjs.7573. Epub 2011 Jun 6.

Impact of ineffective oesophageal motility and wrap type on dysphagia after laparoscopic fundoplication.

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1
Department of Surgery, Level 5, Eleanor Harrald Building, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Laparoscopic 360° fundoplication is the most common operation for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, but is associated with postoperative dysphagia in some patients. Patients with ineffective oesophageal motility may have a higher risk of developing postoperative dysphagia, but this remains unclear.

METHODS:

From 1991 to 2010, 2040 patients underwent primary laparoscopic fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and met the study inclusion criteria; 343 had a 90°, 498 a 180° and 1199 a 360° fundoplication. Primary peristalsis and distal contraction amplitude during oesophageal manometry were determined for 1354 patients. Postoperative dysphagia scores (range 0-45) were recorded at 3 and 12 months, then annually. Oesophageal dilatations and/or reoperations for dysphagia were recorded.

RESULTS:

Preoperative oesophageal motility did not influence postoperative dysphagia scores, the need for dilatation and/or reoperation up to 6 years. Three-month dysphagia scores were lower after 90° and 180° compared with 360° fundoplication (mean(s.e.m.) 8·0(0·6) and 9·8(0·5) respectively versus 11·9(0·4); P < 0·001 and P = 0·003), but these differences diminished after 6 years of follow-up. The incidence of dilatation and reoperation for dysphagia was lower after 90° (2·6 and 0·6 per cent respectively) and 180° (4·4 and 1·0 per cent) fundoplications than with a 360° wrap (9·8 and 6·8 per cent; both P < 0·001 versus 90° and 180° groups).

CONCLUSION:

Tailoring the degree of fundoplication according to preoperative oesophageal motility by standard manometric parameters has no long-term impact on postoperative dysphagia. There is, however, a proportionate increase in short-term dysphagia scores with increasing degree of wrap, and a corresponding proportionate increase in dilatations and reoperations for dysphagia. These differences in dysphagia scores diminish with time.

PMID:
21647868
DOI:
10.1002/bjs.7573
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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