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Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2011 Oct;37(10):1312-24. doi: 10.1177/0146167211410439. Epub 2011 Jun 6.

Stereotype threat and female communication styles.

Author information

1
University of Queensland, School of Psychology, Brisbane, Australia. c.vonhippel@psy.uq.edu.au

Abstract

A large body of research has documented the performance-debilitating effects of stereotype threat for individuals, but there is a paucity of research exploring interpersonal consequences of stereotype threat. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that stereotype threat would change the style in which women communicate. Results indicate that women who experience stereotype threat regarding leadership abilities react against the stereotype by adopting a more masculine communication style. Study 2 provides evidence that self-affirmation eliminates this effect of stereotype threat on women's communication styles. A third study demonstrates an ironic consequence of this effect of stereotype threat on women's communication--when women under stereotype threat adopt a more masculine communication style, they are rated as less warm and likeable, and evaluators indicate less willingness to comply with their requests. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID:
21646549
DOI:
10.1177/0146167211410439
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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