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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Jan;219(2):411-20. doi: 10.1007/s00213-011-2367-4. Epub 2011 Jun 4.

Work aversion and associated changes in dopamine and serotonin transporter after methamphetamine exposure in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, California State University, Los Angeles, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90032, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Methamphetamine (mAMPH) administration in animals can lead to a variety of cognitive and behavioral deficits. We previously reported non-acute reversal learning impairments after a single-day administration of mAMPH, providing evidence of this drug's selective effects on inhibitory control. Effortful decision-making (i.e., how much effort to invest in rewards) is an aspect of cognition that has not yet been explored after mAMPH.

OBJECTIVES:

Given that frontostriatal circuitry mediating this type of choice is vulnerable to the effects of mAMPH, we tested the hypothesis that mAMPH may also affect decision-making involving effort, another form of cognitive flexibility.

METHODS:

We examined the non-acute effects of an experimenter-administered single day of mAMPH on effort discounting. In this task, rats previously treated with mAMPH or saline (SAL) could select a high reward at the cost of climbing over a tall barrier or a low reward with no barrier impeding its procurement.

RESULTS:

Following treatment, mAMPH rats were more work-averse than SAL rats. A control task showed there were no treatment group differences when the high and low rewards involved equal work: all rats chose the high reward preferentially. There were no significant treatment group differences in [(125)I]RTI-55 binding to dopamine and serotonin transporters (DAT, SERT) in any of the regions assayed; however, there were significant correlations of accumbens DAT and cingulate SERT with post-treatment performance.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that even modest dose mAMPH exposure has long-lasting effects on effortful decision-making and may do so through influences on forebrain monoaminergic systems.

PMID:
21643674
PMCID:
PMC3182297
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-011-2367-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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