Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Youth Adolesc. 2012 Feb;41(2):202-16. doi: 10.1007/s10964-011-9680-4. Epub 2011 Jun 4.

Is educational achievement a turning point for incarcerated delinquents across race and sex?

Author information

1
College of Criminology & Criminal Justice, Florida State University, 634 W. Call Street, Tallahassee, FL 32306-1127, USA. tblomberg@fsu.edu

Abstract

Research has linked the role of education to delinquency, but much of the focus has been on general population samples and with little attention to demographic differences. Employing a cumulative disadvantage framework that integrates elements of informal social control and labeling theories, this article examines whether academic achievement serves as a positive turning point and re-directs juvenile delinquents away from subsequent offending. Attention is also given to race/sex contingencies. Using a sample of 4,147 delinquents released from Florida correctional institutions (86% male, 57% non-White, average age at release = 16.8 years), propensity score analysis yielded two findings: youth with above average academic achievement while incarcerated were significantly more likely to return to school post-release, and youth with above average attendance in public school were significantly less likely to be re-arrested in the 1-year post-release period. While the academic gains were pronounced among African-American males, the preventive effects of school attendance are similar across race and sex, suggesting that education can be a part of a larger prevention effort that assists juvenile delinquents in successful community re-entry.

PMID:
21643669
DOI:
10.1007/s10964-011-9680-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center