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Am J Pathol. 2011 Jun;178(6):2470-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2011.02.034.

Skp2 is necessary for Myc-induced keratinocyte proliferation but dispensable for Myc oncogenic activity in the oral epithelium.

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1
Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

The proto-oncogene c-Myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Myc accelerates the rate of cell proliferation, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Moreover, p27(Kip1) protein levels are regulated by ubiquitin-mediated turnover, leading to destruction by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(Skp2). Therefore, we hypothesize that a lack of Skp2 expression should lead to increased p27(Kip1) levels and further inhibition of Myc-mediated proliferation and tumorigenesis. Myc expression in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) led to increased keratinocyte proliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors within the oral cavity. We generated K5-Myc-transgenic mice in an Skp2-null background. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that Myc-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation was abolished by the loss of Skp2. However, Skp2 ablation did not affect Myc-driven tumorigenesis because the incidence, latency, and degree of differentiation of oral tumors were identical between K5-Myc/Skp2(+/+) and K5-Myc/Skp2(-/-) mice. Altogether, these findings suggest that Skp2 and p27(Kip1) are critical for Myc-driven keratinocyte proliferation; however, Myc-mediated tumorigenesis in the oral epithelium is independent of the Skp2-p27(Kip1) axis.

PMID:
21641375
PMCID:
PMC3124025
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajpath.2011.02.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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