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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Sep;205(3):208.e1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2011.03.058. Epub 2011 Apr 7.

Systematic review of first-trimester vitamin D normative levels and outcomes of pregnancy.

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1
Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. natasha.nassar@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We undertook a systematic review to assess normative levels of vitamin D in early pregnancy and association with subsequent pregnancy outcomes.

STUDY DESIGN:

Medline and Embase databases and reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria were pregnant populations, blood sample taken during the first trimester, and serum hydroxyvitamin D levels assessed.

RESULTS:

Eighteen studies reported vitamin D levels in first trimester (n = 11-3730), and 5 examined pregnancy outcomes. Mean vitamin D concentrations differed when stratified by ethnicity: white (mean [SD]: 29.4 [11.7] to 73.1 [27.1] nmol/L) and nonwhite (15.2 [12.1] to 43 [12] nmol/L). Most studies used general population cut points to define deficiency and found a large proportion of women deficient. Two articles examined risk of preeclampsia and reported differing findings, whereas 2 of 3 found low levels associated with increased risk of small-for-gestational age births.

CONCLUSION:

There is no clear definition of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy and insufficient evidence to suggest low vitamin D levels in early pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

PMID:
21640968
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2011.03.058
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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