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J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 May;33(5):443-448. doi: 10.1016/S1701-2163(16)34876-9.

Higher caesarean section rates in women with higher body mass index: are we managing labour differently?

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal QC.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology,Royal Victoria Hospital,McGill University Montreal QC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Higher body mass index has been associated with an increased risk of Caesarean section. The effect of differences in labour management on this association has not yet been evaluated.

METHODS:

We conducted a cohort study using data from the McGill Obstetrics and Neonatal Database for deliveries taking place during a 10-year period. Women's BMI at delivery was categorized as normal (20 to 24.9), overweight (25 to 29.9), obese (30 to 39.9), or morbidly obese (≥ 40). We evaluated the effect of the management of labour on the need for Caesarean section using unconditional logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

Data were available for 11 922 women, of whom 2289 women had normal weight, 5663 were overweight, 3730 were obese, and 240 were morbidly obese. After adjustment for known confounding variables, increased BMI category was associated with an overall increase in the use of oxytocin and in the use of epidural analgesia, and with a decrease in use of forceps and vacuum extraction among second stage deliveries. Higher BMI was also found to be associated with earlier decisions to perform a Caesarean section in the second stage of labour. When adjusted for these differences in the management of labour, the increasing rate of Caesarean section observed with increasing BMI category was markedly attenuated (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Women with an increased BMI are managed differently in labour than women of normal weight. This difference in management in part explains the increased rate of Caesarean section observed with higher BMI.

PMID:
21639963
DOI:
10.1016/S1701-2163(16)34876-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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