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Mol Biol Rep. 2012 Mar;39(3):2313-9. doi: 10.1007/s11033-011-0981-1. Epub 2011 Jun 3.

A common variant in the adiponectin gene and polycystic ovary syndrome risk.

Author information

1
Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

In this study, we explored whether polymorphisms in insulin receptor (INSR), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and vitamin D receptor (VDR) genes are associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 362 subjects, including 181 women with PCOS and 181 controls were enrolled in this case-control study. Two SNPs (rs2059806 and rs1799817) in the INSR gene, two SNPs (rs2241766 and rs1501299) in the ADIPOQ gene, one SNP (rs6256) in the PTH gene, and one SNP (rs757343) in the VDR gene were analyzed using PCR-RFLP method. We observed no significant difference in genotype and allele frequencies between the women with PCOS and controls for the rs2059806, rs1799817, rs1501299, rs6256, and rs757343 polymorphisms either before or after adjustment for confounding factors including age and BMI. However, the ADIPOQ rs2241766 "TT" genotype compared with "TG and GG" genotypes was associated with a 1.93-fold increased risk for PCOS (P = 0.006, OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.20-3.11), and the differences remained significant after adjustment for age and BMI (P = 0.039, OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.03-2.86). Furthermore, the ADIPOQ rs2241766 "T" allele was significantly overrepresented in women with PCOS than controls (P = 0.006; OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.18-2.70), and the difference remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest that the ADIPOQ rs2241766 "TT" genotype is a marker of increased PCOS susceptibility. This study also indicates for the first time that there are no significant association between INSR rs2059806, PTH rs6256, and VDR rs757343 gene polymorphisms and PCOS risk. However, these data remain to be confirmed in larger studies and in other populations.

PMID:
21637951
DOI:
10.1007/s11033-011-0981-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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