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J Chiropr Med. 2010 Jun;9(2):69-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jcm.2010.02.005.

An atypical case of nephrolithiasis with transient remission of symptoms following spinal manipulation.

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1
Director, Southport Grace Wellness Center, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Nephrolithiasis is a common condition with symptoms similar to common mechanical lesions of the lumbar spine and pelvis. The purpose of this report is to outline a case of nephrolithiasis that closely mimicked sacroiliac joint syndrome in subjective report, objective findings, and reduction of symptoms with spinal manipulation.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

A 41-year-old obese male patient with mild pain over the left posterior sacroiliac joint, penile paresthesia, and the penile sensation of urinary urgency presented for chiropractic care. Subjective history and objective evaluation suggested sacroiliac joint syndrome.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:

A trial of conservative management including spinal manipulation was initiated. Following each treatment, the patient reported temporary relief of all symptoms (4 hours to 2 days). After unsuccessful permanent resolution of symptoms, a urinalysis was performed; and a follow-up computerized tomography scan revealed a large renal calculus obstructing the left ureter. Laser lithotripsy produced obliteration of the stone and complete resolution of symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

This report outlines the potential overlap of symptoms of visceral and somatic lesions in both presentation and response to care. In this case, a favorable response to spinal manipulation masked the most likely underlying symptom generator. This encounter demonstrates the potential need for further clinical examination in the instance of the unresponsive mechanical lesion. This report also supports the need for future research into spinal manipulation as a possible adjunct for visceral pain management.

KEYWORDS:

Chiropractic; Nephrolithiasis; Renal calculi; Spinal manipulation

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