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Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jun 15;52(12):1431-6. doi: 10.1093/cid/cir234.

Follow-up of 686 patients with acute Q fever and detection of chronic infection.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, Center for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. wim.van.der.hoek@rivm.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent outbreaks in the Netherlands allowed for laboratory follow-up of a large series of patients with acute Q fever and for evaluation of test algorithms to detect chronic Q fever, a condition with considerable morbidity and mortality.

METHODS:

For 686 patients with acute Q fever, IgG antibodies to Coxiella burnetii were determined using an immunofluorescence assay at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed after 12 months and on earlier serum samples with an IgG phase I antibody titer ≥ 1:1024.

RESULTS:

In 43% of patients, the IgG phase II antibody titers remained high (≥ 1:1024) at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. Three months after acute Q fever, 14% of the patients had an IgG phase I titer ≥ 1:1024, which became negative later in 81%. IgG phase I antibody titers were rarely higher than phase II titers. Eleven cases of chronic Q fever were identified on the basis of serological profile, PCR results, and clinical presentation. Six of these patients were known to have clinical risk factors at the time of acute Q fever. In a comparison of various serological algorithms, IgG phase I titer ≥ 1:1024 at 6 months had the most favorable sensitivity and positive predictive value for the detection of chronic Q fever.

CONCLUSIONS:

The wide variation of serological and PCR results during the follow-up of acute Q fever implies that the diagnosis of chronic Q fever, necessitating long-term antibiotic treatment, must be based primarily on clinical grounds. Different serological follow-up strategies are needed for patients with and without known risk factors for chronic Q fever.

PMID:
21628483
DOI:
10.1093/cid/cir234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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