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Epidemics. 2011 Jun;3(2):103-8. doi: 10.1016/j.epidem.2011.03.003. Epub 2011 Apr 5.

The impact of school holidays on the social mixing patterns of school children.

Author information

1
Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. Ken.Eames@lshtm.ac.uk

Abstract

School holidays are recognised to be of great epidemiological importance for a wide range of infectious diseases; this is postulated to be because the social mixing patterns of school children - a key population group - change significantly during the holiday period. However, there is little direct quantitative evidence to confirm this belief. Here, we present the results of a prospective survey designed to provide a detailed comparison of social mixing patterns of school children during school terms and during the school holidays. Paired data were collected, with participants recording their social contacts once during term time and once during the holiday period. We found that the daily number of recorded encounters approximately halved during the holidays, and that the number of close contact encounters fell by approximately one third. The holiday period also saw a change in the age structure of children's social contacts, with far fewer contacts of their own age, but an increase in the number of encounters with adults, particularly older adults. A greater amount of mixing between children at different schools was recorded during the holiday. We suggest, therefore, that whilst infections may spread rapidly within schools during term time, in the holiday period there are increased opportunities for transmission to other schools and other age groups.

PMID:
21624781
DOI:
10.1016/j.epidem.2011.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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