Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Sep 1;137(1):245-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.05.015. Epub 2011 May 17.

Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) root fractions: differential effects on postprandial glycemia in healthy individuals.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, 70 Richmond St. E., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5C1N8.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Variations in ginsenoside profile may predict the postprandial glucose (PPG)-lowering efficacy of ginseng. Previously we reported differential PPG-lowering effects with two Korean red ginseng (KRG) root. FRACTIONS: body and rootlets, of variable ginsenoside profiles. Whether this effect is reproducible with a different KRG source is unclear. We therefore tested two root fractions from a KRG source with elevated ginsenoside levels to assess its effect on PPG.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

After a 12-h overnight fast, 13 healthy individuals (6M:7F; age=28 ± 10 y; BMI=24.1 ± 3 kg/m2; FBG=4.77 ± 0.04 mmol/L) randomly received either 3g of KRG-body, rootlets or placebo, on three separate visits. Treatments were consumed 60 min prior to a standard test meal with capillary blood samples at -60, 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min.

RESULTS:

The KRGrootlets had>6 fold total ginsensosides than the KRG-body but did not significantly affect PPG. Despite a reduced ginsenoside profile, KRG-body lowered PPG levels at 45, 60, 90 and 120 min during the test (p<0.05), rendering an overall reduction of 27% in incremental area under the glucose curve compared to the control (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Comparing the results with a previously studied batch of KRG suggests a potential therapeutic dose range for ginsenosides. This observation should be clinically verified with acute screening and ginsenoside composition analysis.

PMID:
21619921
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2011.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center