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Brain Inj. 2011;25(7-8):761-6. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2011.579935.

Public knowledge of 'concussion' and the different terminology used to communicate about mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

The primary objective was to investigate the public's general knowledge about concussion (mild traumatic brain injury) and to examine whether terminology influenced attributions made about individuals who experience concussion.

DESIGN:

A random selection of the community was polled to identify public understanding of concussion. To encourage candid responses, a self-report survey method was used.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

One hundred and three members of the general public were asked to indicate if they associated specific attributes with brain injury or head injury, depending on the randomly assigned questionnaire they completed. Participants also completed a questionnaire about their knowledge of concussion and were asked to indicate whether they or someone they knew had experienced an injury to the head.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

Participants incorrectly evaluated 20% (2/10) of statements regarding concussion knowledge and were relatively uncertain about another 20% (2/10) of statements. Negative attributes were associated more with brain than head injury, although those with prior experience made more positive attributions than those without. Fifty-nine per cent of participants who had experienced a concussion stated they had no brain/head injury.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, public knowledge about concussion and different terminology associated with this injury type is substantially inaccurate. More accurate information is required to increase understanding.

PMID:
21619461
DOI:
10.3109/02699052.2011.579935
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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