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Osteoporos Int. 2012 Mar;23(3):1163-70. doi: 10.1007/s00198-011-1662-6. Epub 2011 May 26.

UGT2B17 gene deletion associated with an increase in bone mineral density similar to the effect of hormone replacement in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche de l'Hôpital St-François d'Assise du Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, 10 rue de l'Espinay, Québec G1L 3L5, Canada. sylvie.giroux@crsfa.ulaval.ca

Abstract

UGT2B17 is one of the most important enzymes for androgen metabolism. In addition, the UGT2B17 gene is one of the most commonly deleted regions of the human genome. The deletion was previously found associated with higher femoral bone density in men and women, and we replicated this association in a sample of postmenopausal who never used hormone therapy.

INTRODUCTION:

Deletion of the UGT2B17 gene was previously shown to be associated with a higher hip bone mineral density (BMD). Using a PCR assay, we tried to replicate the association among a large group of 2,379 women. We examined the effect of the deletion on femoral neck BMD and lumbar spine BMD according to the menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

METHODS:

We used a high-throughput PCR assay to identify the gene and the deletion in a population of well-characterized women. Two additional polymorphisms, UGT2B28 deletion and UGT2B15 rs1902023 G > T were also investigated.

RESULTS:

Only UGT2B17 deletion was associated with LS and FN BMD. Furthermore, the association was seen only among postmenopausal women who had never used hormone replacement as in the first reported association.

CONCLUSIONS:

We confirmed the association between UGT2B17 deletion and a higher LS and FN BMD. In addition, we show that the association is observed among postmenopausal women who never used HRT consistent with the enzymatic function of UGT2B17. The analysis shows that those having one or two UGT2B17 alleles benefit from HRT, which is not the case for null carriers.

PMID:
21614655
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-011-1662-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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