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Eur J Cancer. 2011 Sep;47(14):2195-201. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2011.04.022. Epub 2011 May 24.

Psychiatric treatment in men with prostate cancer--results from a Nation-wide, population-based cohort study from PCBaSe Sweden.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. anna.bill.axelson@akademiska.se

Abstract

AIM:

To explore whether the self-reported psychological distress among men with prostate cancer was to the extent that it required psychiatric treatment.

METHODS:

PCBaSe Sweden, a merged database based on the National Prostate Cancer Register including 97% of all prostate cancers registered as well as age-matched controls. We calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals to compare risks of psychiatric treatment due to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder controlling for age and socio-economic factors. We used odds ratios to compare use or no use of antidepressants.

FINDINGS:

In total 72,613 men with prostate cancer and 217,839 men without prostate cancer were included for analyses. Psychiatric hospitalisation due to depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly increased (RR 1.29, (95% CI 1.14-1.45), RR 1.42 (95% CI 1.12-1.80) and RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.16-2.24), respectively). However, hospitalisations due to anxiety were only increased in men with more advanced tumours RR 2.28 (95% CI 1.45-3.57). The use of antidepressants was increased for all men with prostate cancer RR 1.65 (95% CI 1.54-1.77) and treatment strategies RR 1.93 (95% CI 1.75-2.13).

INTERPRETATION:

Men diagnosed with prostate cancer had increased risk of psychiatric treatment for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and use of antidepressants regardless of risk group and treatment strategy compared to age-matched controls, whilst more advanced prostate cancer was associated with severe anxiety disorders.

PMID:
21612913
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2011.04.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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