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J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2011 Apr;49(4):205-11. doi: 10.3340/jkns.2011.49.4.205. Epub 2011 Apr 30.

Neuroprotective effect of anthocyanin on experimental traumatic spinal cord injury.

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1
Department of Neurosurgery, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the neuroprotective effect of anthocyanin, oxygen radical scavenger extracted from raspberries, after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats.

METHODS:

THE ANIMALS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS : the vehicle-treated group (control group, n=20) received an oral administration of normal saline via stomach intubation immediately after SCI, and the anthocyanin-treated group (AT group, n=20) received 400 mg/kg of cyanidin 3-O-β-glucoside (C3G) in the same way. We compared the neurological functions, superoxide expressions and lesion volumes in two groups.

RESULTS:

At 14 days after SCI, the AT group showed significant improvement of the BBB score by 16.7±3.4%, platform hang by 40.0±9.1% and hind foot bar grab by 30.8±8.4% (p<0.05 in all outcomes). The degree of superoxide expression, represented by the ratio of red fluorescence intensity, was significantly lower in the AT group (0.98±0.38) than the control group (1.34±0.24) (p<0.05). The lesion volume in lesion periphery was 32.1±2.4 µL in the control and 24.5±2.3 µL in the AT group, respectively (p<0.05), and the motor neuron cell number of the anterior horn in lesion periphery was 8.3±5.1 cells/HPF in the control and 13.4±6.3 cells/HPF in the AT group, respectively (p<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Anthocyanin seemed to reduce lesion volume and neuronal loss by its antioxidant effect and these resulted in improved functional recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanin; Antioxidants; Spinal cord trauma

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