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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Jun 7;108(23):9478-83. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1019418108. Epub 2011 May 23.

Cholinergic chemosensory cells in the trachea regulate breathing.

Author information

1
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Institute for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen D-35385, Germany. Gabriela.Krasteva@anatomie.med.uni-giessen.de

Abstract

In the epithelium of the lower airways, a cell type of unknown function has been termed "brush cell" because of a distinctive ultrastructural feature, an apical tuft of microvilli. Morphologically similar cells in the nose have been identified as solitary chemosensory cells responding to taste stimuli and triggering trigeminal reflexes. Here we show that brush cells of the mouse trachea express the receptors (Tas2R105, Tas2R108), the downstream signaling molecules (α-gustducin, phospholipase C(β2)) of bitter taste transduction, the synthesis and packaging machinery for acetylcholine, and are addressed by vagal sensory nerve fibers carrying nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Tracheal application of an nAChR agonist caused a reduction in breathing frequency. Similarly, cycloheximide, a Tas2R108 agonist, evoked a drop in respiratory rate, being sensitive to nicotinic receptor blockade and epithelium removal. This identifies brush cells as cholinergic sensors of the chemical composition of the lower airway luminal microenvironment that are directly linked to the regulation of respiration.

PMID:
21606356
PMCID:
PMC3111311
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1019418108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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