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Emotion. 2011 Dec;11(6):1379-87. doi: 10.1037/a0022902. Epub 2011 May 23.

Happy guys finish last: the impact of emotion expressions on sexual attraction.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4. jltracy@psych.ubc.ca

Abstract

This research examined the relative sexual attractiveness of individuals showing emotion expressions of happiness, pride, and shame compared with a neutral control. Across two studies using different images and samples ranging broadly in age (total N = 1041), a large gender difference emerged in the sexual attractiveness of happy displays: happiness was the most attractive female emotion expression, and one of the least attractive in males. In contrast, pride showed the reverse pattern; it was the most attractive male expression, and one of the least attractive in women. Shame displays were relatively attractive in both genders, and, among younger adult women viewers, male shame was more attractive than male happiness, and not substantially less than male pride. Effects were largely consistent with evolutionary and socio-cultural-norm accounts. Overall, this research provides the first evidence that distinct emotion expressions have divergent effects on sexual attractiveness, which vary by gender but largely hold across age.

PMID:
21604870
DOI:
10.1037/a0022902
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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