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Eur Radiol. 2011 Aug;21(8):1577-85. doi: 10.1007/s00330-011-2112-8. Epub 2011 May 21.

Unrequested information from routine diagnostic chest CT predicts future cardiovascular events.

Author information

1
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Universiteitsweg 100, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. p.c.a.jacobs@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

An increase in the number of CT investigations will likely result in a an increase in unrequested information. Clinical relevance of these findings is unknown. This is the first follow-up study to investigate the prognostic relevance of subclinical coronary (CAC) and aortic calcification (TAC) as contained in routine diagnostic chest CT in a clinical care population.

METHODS:

The follow-up of 10,410 subjects (>40 years) from a multicentre, clinical care-based cohort of patients included 240 fatal to 275 non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (mean follow-up 17.8 months). Patients with a history of CVD were excluded. Coronary (0-12) and aortic calcification (0-8) were semi-quantitatively scored. We used Cox proportional-hazard models to compute hazard ratios to predict CVD events.

RESULTS:

CAC and TAC were significantly and independently predictive of CVD events. Compared with subjects with no calcium, the adjusted risk of a CVD event was 3.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.7-5.2) among patients with severe coronary calcification (CAC score ≥6) and 2.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.0-3.7) among patients with severe aortic calcification (TAC score ≥5).

CONCLUSIONS:

Subclinical vascular calcification on CT is a strong predictor of incident CVD events in a routine clinical care population.

PMID:
21603881
PMCID:
PMC3128256
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-011-2112-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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