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Mol Ther. 2011 Sep;19(9):1667-75. doi: 10.1038/mt.2011.51. Epub 2011 May 17.

Safeguarding nonhuman primate iPS cells with suicide genes.

Author information

1
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA.

Abstract

The development of technology to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells constitutes one of the most exciting scientific breakthroughs because of the enormous potential for regenerative medicine. However, the safety of iPS cell-related products is a major concern for clinical translation. Insertional mutagenesis, possible oncogenic transformation of iPS cells or their derivatives, or the contamination of differentiated iPS cells with undifferentiated cells, resulting in the formation of teratomas, have remained considerable obstacles. Here, we demonstrate the utility of suicide genes to safeguard iPS cells and their derivatives. We found suicide genes can control the cell fate of iPS cells in vitro and in vivo without interfering with their pluripotency and self-renewal capacity. This study will be useful to evaluate the safety of iPS cell technology in a clinically highly relevant, large animal model and further benefit the clinical use of human iPS cells.

PMID:
21587213
PMCID:
PMC3182363
DOI:
10.1038/mt.2011.51
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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