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Anesthesiology. 2011 Jul;115(1):153-64. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e31821950c2.

Regulation of spinal substance p release by intrathecal calcium channel blockade.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The authors investigated the role of different voltage-sensitive calcium channels expressed at presynaptic afferent terminals in substance P release and on nociceptive behavior evoked by intraplantar formalin by examining the effects of intrathecally delivered N- (ziconotide), T- (mibefradil), and L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel blockers (diltiazem and verapamil).

METHODS:

Rats received intrathecal pretreatment with saline or doses of morphine, ziconotide, mibefradil, diltiazem, or verapamil. The effect of these injections upon flinching evoked by intraplantar formalin (5%, 50 μl) was quantified. To assess substance P release, the incidence of neurokinin-1 receptor internalization in the ipsilateral and contralateral lamina I was determined in immunofluorescent-stained tissues.

RESULTS:

Intrathecal morphine (20 μg), ziconotide (0.3, 0.6, and 1 μg), mibefradil (100 μg, but not 50 μg), diltiazem (500 μg, but not 300 μg), and verapamil (200 μg, but not 50 and 100 μg) reduced paw flinching in phase 2 compared with vehicle control (P < 0.05), with no effect on phase 1. Ziconotide (0.3, 0.6, and 1 μg) and morphine (20 μg) significantly inhibited neurokinin-1 receptor internalization (P < 0.05), but mibefradil, diltiazem, and verapamil at the highest doses had no effect.

CONCLUSION:

These results emphasize the role in vivo of N-type but not T- and L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel blockers in mediating the stimulus-evoked substance P release from small primary afferents and suggest that T- and L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel blockers exert antihyperalgesic effects by an action on other populations of afferents or mechanisms involving postsynaptic excitability.

PMID:
21577088
PMCID:
PMC3360553
DOI:
10.1097/ALN.0b013e31821950c2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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