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J Child Neurol. 2011 Aug;26(8):1045-51. doi: 10.1177/0883073811405052. Epub 2011 May 16.

Clinical neurofeedback: case studies, proposed mechanism, and implications for pediatric neurology practice.

Author information

1
Georgetown University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Washington, DC 2000, USA. m.stella.legarda@gunet.georgetown.edu

Abstract

Trends in alternative medicine use by American health care consumers are rising substantially. Extensive literature exists reporting on the effectiveness of neurofeedback in the treatment of autism, closed head injury, insomnia, migraine, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and posttraumatic stress disorder. We speculated that neurofeedback might serve as a therapeutic modality for patients with medically refractory neurological disorders and have begun referring patients to train with clinical neurofeedback practitioners. The modality is not always covered by insurance. Confident their child's medical and neurological needs would continue to be met, the parents of 3 children with epilepsy spectrum disorder decided to have their child train in the modality. The children's individual progress following neurofeedback are each presented here. A proposed mechanism and practice implications are discussed.

PMID:
21576401
DOI:
10.1177/0883073811405052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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