Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2011 Jun;27(3):305-8. doi: 10.1089/jop.2010.0182. Epub 2011 May 16.

Intraocular pressure elevations with loteprednol etabonate: a retrospective chart review.

Author information

1
SeeClearly Vision, McLean, Virginia 22102, USA. rrajpal@seeclearly.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Ocular corticosteroids can cause elevations in intraocular pressure (IOP). The purpose of this study was to characterize the timing and severity of IOP elevations in patients receiving loteprednol etabonate 0.5% or loteprednol etabonate 0.5%/tobramycin 0.3%.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review was conducted at 5 academic and private practices. Any patient who experienced an elevation in IOP ≥5 mm Hg while using loteprednol etabonate or loteprednol etabonate/tobramycin was eligible for inclusion in the study. Data collected included patient demographics, medical and ophthalmic history, concomitant medications, reason for treatment, IOP, and medical and surgical interventions.

RESULTS:

Fifty patients experienced IOP elevations after use of topical loteprednol etabonate and were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) patient age was 58.8 (20.3) years and 66% were women. The most common reasons for prescribing loteprednol etabonate were dry eye (30%), postoperative therapy (22%), and allergic conjunctivitis (16%). Before treatment, 28% of patients had a history of open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Mean (SD) IOP before treatment was 15.5 (3.2) mm Hg and increased to a mean (SD) of 24.7 (6.5) mm Hg, a statistically significant increase of 9.2 (SD: 5.8; range: 5-29) mm Hg (P<0.0001). The median duration of treatment with loteprednol etabonate at the time of observed IOP elevation was 55 days (range: 3 days to 3 years). Twenty-four percent of patients required IOP-lowering medications and 8% required surgery to control the elevated IOP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Alternatives to corticosteroids should be considered when long-term treatment is required for an ocular surface condition.

PMID:
21574815
DOI:
10.1089/jop.2010.0182
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Support Center