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Violence Against Women. 2011 Jun;17(6):743-59. doi: 10.1177/1077801211409728. Epub 2011 May 12.

The Men's Program: does it impact college men's self-reported bystander efficacy and willingness to intervene?

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1
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688-0002, USA. jlr@usouthal.edu

Abstract

This study considered whether a rape prevention program could reduce men's rape myth acceptance, enhance the perceived effectiveness of college men's bystander behavior, and increase men's willingness to intervene as bystanders in potentially dangerous situations. As predicted, college men who experienced The Men's Program significantly increased their self-reported willingness to help as a bystander and their perceived bystander efficacy in comparison to college men who experienced the comparison condition. Men's Program participants also significantly decreased their self-reported rape myth acceptance in comparison with comparison condition participants. The college policy and rape prevention program planning implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID:
21571743
DOI:
10.1177/1077801211409728
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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