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Womens Health Issues. 2011 Jul-Aug;21(4):320-6. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2010.12.003. Epub 2011 May 13.

Burden, characteristics, and outcome of injury among females: observations from Bengaluru, India.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, India.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

With injuries becoming a leading cause of mortality, morbidity, disability, and socioeconomic losses in India and other low- and middle-income countries, its impact on the female population is significant, affecting their multiple roles and functions. The objectives of the present study were to identify the burden, causes, characteristics, and outcomes of injury among females in Bengaluru city.

METHODS:

Information on fatal and nonfatal injuries was collected from the Bangalore city police and the emergency rooms of 22 partner hospitals, respectively, under the Bengaluru Injury Surveillance Program in 2007 and 2008. Data were collected in an uniform manner by trained personnel using standardized methods.

FINDINGS:

Females across all age groups accounted for 26% of fatal and 23% of nonfatal injuries and the highest numbers were among those 16 to 45 years old. Burns and hanging were the leading causes of death; road crashes and poisonings were the major causes of nonfatal injuries. Nearly half of the fatal and one third of the nonfatal injuries were suicides. Pedestrians and two-wheeler riders/pillions were mainly involved in road crashes. Very few received first aid at the injury site and the commonest modes of transportation were a private vehicle or taxi and the local three-wheeler vehicle. More than half of the injured were admitted in the hospitals for medical or surgical management.

CONCLUSION:

Injuries are a major, preventable public health problem. There is a need to strengthen injury prevention and control programs, as well as increased research to understand risk factors and injury mechanisms.

PMID:
21570866
DOI:
10.1016/j.whi.2010.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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