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Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Dec;85(3):e260-4. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.005. Epub 2011 May 13.

Promoting mental health competency in residency training.

Author information

1
Department of General and Community Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA. nsbauer@iupui.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effect our developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) curricular model had on residents' comfort with handling mental health issues.

METHODS:

From August 2007 to January 2010, residents participating in the Indiana University DBP rotation completed a self-assessment questionnaire at baseline and at rotation end. Residents rated their comfort with the identification, treatment, and counseling of mental health problems using a 5-point scale.

RESULTS:

Ninety-four residents completed both self-assessments. At baseline, categorical pediatric residents possessed higher comfort levels toward identification (mean 2.8 vs. 2.3 for non-categorical pediatrics residents, p<0.05), treatment (2.6 vs. 2.2, p<0.05) and counseling of mental health issues (2.7 vs. 2.1, p<0.005). Residents who were parents were also more comfortable. At rotation end, all residents showed significant improvements in self-rated comfort (4.0 vs. 2.6 for identification, p≤0.05; 4.0 vs. 2.4 for treatment, p≤0.05; and 4.0 vs. 2.4 for counseling, p≤0.05). This remained true regardless of being a categorical pediatric resident, a parent, or primary care-oriented.

CONCLUSION:

Our curricular model promotes residents' comfort with handling common mental health issues in practice.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Increasing residents' comfort may influence the frequency of active discussion of mental health issues during well-child visits and lead to earlier diagnosis and needed treatment.

PMID:
21570796
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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