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BMC Public Health. 2011 May 10;11:291. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-291.

A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records.

Author information

1
Division of Primary Care, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. lisa.szatkowski@nottingham.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Brief cessation advice delivered to smokers during routine primary care consultations increases smoking cessation rates. However, in previous studies investigating recall of smoking cessation advice, smokers have reported more advice being received than is actually documented in their medical records. Recording of smoking cessation advice in UK primary care medical records has increased since the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) in 2004, and so we compare recall and recording of cessation advice since this time to assess whether or not agreement between these two data sources has improved.

METHODS:

For each year from 2000 to 2009, the proportion of patients in The Health Improvement Network Database (THIN) with a recording of cessation advice in their notes in the last 12 months was calculated. In 2004, 2005 and 2008, these figures were compared to rates of patients recalling having received cessation advice in the last 12 months in the Primary Care Trust (PCT) Patient Surveys, with adjustment for age, sex and regional differences between the populations.

RESULTS:

In 2004 there was good agreement between the proportion of THIN patients who had cessation advice recorded in their medical records and the proportion recalling advice in the Patient Survey. However, in both 2005 and 2008, more patients had cessation advice recorded in their medical records than recalled receiving advice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Since the introduction of the QOF, the rate of recording of cessation advice in primary care medical records has exceeded that of patient recall. Whilst both data sources have limitations, our study suggests that, in recent years, the proportion of smokers being advised to quit by primary care health professionals may not have improved as much as the improved recording rates imply.

PMID:
21569283
PMCID:
PMC3100256
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-11-291
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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