Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Public Health. 2011 Jul;101(7):e1-3. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300186. Epub 2011 May 12.

Smoking cessation behavior among intermittent smokers versus daily smokers.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh, Center for Research on Health Care, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. tindleha@upmc.edu

Abstract

Nondaily intermittent smokers (ITS) are common, but their cessation behavior remains elusive. We examined cessation of native-ITS (n = 2040), converted-ITS (n = 1808), and daily smokers (DS; n = 25 344). All ITS were more likely than were DS to make a quit attempt (native-ITS adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.42, 1.80; converted-ITS AOR = 3.33, 95% CI = 2.93, 3.78). Native-ITS (18%) and converted-ITS (27%) were more likely than were DS (13%) to quit smoking (native-ITS AOR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.07, 1.67; converted-ITS AOR = 2.36, 95% CI = 2.01, 2.78), but the low cessation rates of ITS challenge their nonaddicted status.

PMID:
21566030
PMCID:
PMC3110242
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2011.300186
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center