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Eur J Oral Sci. 2011 Jun;119(3):219-24. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0722.2011.00823.x. Epub 2011 May 5.

Reliability of electromyographic activity vs. bite-force from human masticatory muscles.

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1
Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. ymg@buffalo.edu

Abstract

The reproducibility of electromyographic (EMG) activity in relation to static bite-force from masticatory muscles for a given biting situation is largely unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the reliability of EMG activity in relation to static bite-force in humans. Eighty-four subjects produced five unilateral static bites of different forces at different biting positions on molars and incisors, at two separate sessions, and the surface EMG activities were recorded from temporalis, masseter, and suprahyoid muscles bilaterally. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were determined, and an ICC of ≥ 0.60 indicated good reliability of these slopes. The ICCs for jaw-closing muscles during molar biting were: temporalis muscles, ipsilateral 0.58-0.93 and contralateral 0.88-0.91; and masseter muscles, ipsilateral 0.75-0.86 and contralateral 0.69-0.88. The ICCs for jaw-closing muscles during incisor biting were: temporalis muscles, ipsilateral 0.56-0.81 and contralateral 0.34-0.86; and masseter muscles, ipsilateral 0.65-0.78 and contralateral 0.59-0.80. For the suprahyoid muscles the 95% CIs were mostly wide and most included zero. The slopes of the EMG activity vs. bite-force for a given biting situation were reliable for temporalis and masseter muscles. These results support the use of these outcome measurements for the estimation and validation of mechanical models of the masticatory system.

PMID:
21564316
PMCID:
PMC3099402
DOI:
10.1111/j.1600-0722.2011.00823.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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