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Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1640-9. doi: 10.1017/S1368980011000747. Epub 2011 May 6.

Food shopping habits, physical activity and health-related indicators among adults aged ≥70 years.

Author information

1
Centre for Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, 8 Priory Road, Bristol BS81TZ, UK. Janice.thompson@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the food shopping habits of older adults in the UK and explore their potential associations with selected health-related indicators.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study including objectively measured physical activity levels, BMI, physical function and self-reported health status and dietary intake.

SETTING:

Bristol, UK.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 240 older adults aged ≥70 years living independently.

RESULTS:

Mean age was 78·1 (sd 5·7) years; 66·7 % were overweight or obese and 4 % were underweight. Most (80·0 %) carried out their own food shopping; 53·3 % shopped at least once weekly. Women were more likely to shop alone (P < 0·001) and men more likely to shop with their spouse (P < 0·001). Men were more likely than women to drive to food shopping (P < 0·001), with women more likely to take the bus or be driven (P < 0·001). Most reported ease in purchasing fruit and vegetables (72·9 %) and low-fat products (67·5 %); 19·2 % reported low fibre intakes and 16·2 % reported high fat intakes. Higher levels of physical function and physical activity and better general health were significantly correlated with the ease of purchasing fresh fruit, vegetables and low-fat products. Shopping more often was associated with higher fat intake (P = 0·03); higher levels of deprivation were associated with lower fibre intake (P = 0·019).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest a pattern of food shopping carried out primarily by car at least once weekly at large supermarket chains, with most finding high-quality fruit, vegetables and low-fat products easily accessible. Higher levels of physical function and physical activity and better self-reported health are important in supporting food shopping and maintaining independence.

PMID:
21557866
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980011000747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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