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Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Sep;38(3):288-94. doi: 10.1002/uog.9041. Epub 2011 Aug 10.

Neurobehavioral outcomes in preterm, growth-restricted infants with and without prenatal advanced signs of brain-sparing.

Author information

1
Maternal-Fetal Medicine Department, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ffiguera@clinic.ub.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the neurobehavioral outcomes of preterm infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), with and without prenatal advanced brain-sparing.

METHODS:

A cohort of IUGR infants (birth weight < 10(th) percentile with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler) born before 34 weeks of gestation was compared with a control group of appropriate-for-gestational age infants matched for gestational age at delivery. MCA pulsatility index was determined in all cases within 72 hours before delivery. Neonatal neurobehavior was evaluated at 40 weeks' ( ± 1) corrected age using the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale. The effect of abnormal MCA pulsatility index (< 5(th) percentile) on each neurobehavioral area was adjusted for maternal smoking status and socioeconomic level, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, pre-eclampsia, newborn illness severity score and infant sex by multiple linear and logistic regression.

RESULTS:

A total of 126 preterm newborns (64 controls and 62 IUGR) were included. Among IUGR fetuses, the proportion of abnormal MCA Doppler parameters was 53%. Compared with appropriate-for-gestational age infants, newborns in the IUGR subgroup with abnormal MCA Doppler had significantly lower neurobehavioral scores in the areas of habituation, motor system, social-interactive and attention. Similarly, the proportion of infants with abnormal neurobehavioral scores was significantly higher in the IUGR subgroup with abnormal MCA Doppler parameters in the areas of habituation, social-interactive, motor system and attention.

CONCLUSION:

Abnormal MCA Doppler findings are predictive of neurobehavioral impairment among preterm newborns with IUGR, which suggests that this reflects an advanced stage of brain injury with a higher risk of abnormal neurological maturation.

PMID:
21557369
DOI:
10.1002/uog.9041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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