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Pharm Biol. 2011 Jun;49(6):614-9. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2010.539617.

The anti-angiogenic herbal composition Ob-X from Morus alba, Melissa officinalis, and Artemisia capillaris regulates obesity in genetically obese ob/ob mice.

Author information

1
Department of Life Sciences, Mokwon University, Daejeon, Korea. yoon60@mokwon.ac.kr

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The growth and development of adipose tissue leading to obesity is suggested to depend on angiogenesis. Our previous study showed that Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae), Morus alba L. (Moraceae), and Artemisia capillaris Thunb. (Compositae) are involved in the regulation of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that Ob-X, a mixture of three herbs, M. alba, M. officinalis, and A. capillaris, can regulate obesity.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the inhibitory effect of Ob-X on obesity in genetically obese ob/ob mice.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The effect of Ob-X on angiogenesis was measured using a mouse Matrigel plug assay. The effects of Ob-X on obesity were investigated in ob/ob mice.

RESULTS:

Ob-X inhibited angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by decreased blood vessel density in a mouse matrigel plug assay. Administration of Ob-X to ob/ob mice for 5 weeks produced a significant reduction in body weight gain by 27% compared with control (12.1 ± 3.01 vs. 16.6 ± 2.24 g, respectively). Ob-X also significantly decreased visceral adipose tissue mass by 15% (0.87 ± 0.12 vs. 1.02 ± 0.15 g, respectively). The size of adipocytes in visceral adipose tissue was reduced by 46% in Ob-X-treated mice. Ob-X treatment inhibited hepatic lipid accumulation and significantly decreased circulating glucose levels compared with controls (197 ± 56.5 vs. 365 ± 115 mg/dL, respectively).

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that Ob-X, which has an anti-angiogenic activity, reduces body weight gain and visceral adipose tissue mass in genetically obese mice, providing evidence that obesity can be prevented by angiogenesis inhibitors.

PMID:
21554004
DOI:
10.3109/13880209.2010.539617
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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