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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2011 Jul;284(1):235-40. doi: 10.1007/s00404-011-1917-7. Epub 2011 May 5.

Changes in prepregnancy body mass index between pregnancies and risk of gestational and type 2 diabetes.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We investigated whether changes in interpregnancy body mass index (BMI) influence the risk of gestational and type 2 diabetes among a cohort of women with two consecutive live, singleton births of 20-44 weeks gestation (n = 232,272).

METHODS:

Logistic regression models were used to examine the risk for development of gestational or type 2 diabetes during the second pregnancy. Mothers with normal weight for both pregnancies (normal-normal) served as the referent group.

RESULTS:

Across all BMI categories, mothers with significant weight gain (i.e., moving from a lower BMI category into a higher category) had an increased risk for the development of diabetes. Mothers who moved from normal prepregnancy weight (BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m²) in the first pregnancy to obese prepregnancy weight (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m²) in the second pregnancy showed the greatest increment in risk. These mothers exhibited a threefold risk for developing diabetes (OR = 3.21, 95% CI 2.76-3.73). Mothers who maintained their interpregnancy BMI weight category or who moved to a lower BMI category had reduced risk for gestational and type 2 diabetes. The risk associated with mothers who moved to a lower BMI category was approximately half that of the normal-normal BMI category.

CONCLUSION:

Interpregnancy weight gain is associated with a dose-response increase in risk of diabetes. Establishing a normal interpregnancy BMI may reduce the risk of diabetes.

PMID:
21544736
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-011-1917-7
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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