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J Bone Miner Res. 2011 May;26(5):955-64. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.286.

Serum uric acid is associated with bone health in older men: a cross-sectional population-based study.

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1
Bone Research Program, ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

Serum uric acid (UA) is a strong endogenous antioxidant. Since oxidative stress has been linked to osteoporosis, we examined the association between serum UA levels and bone mineral density (BMD), prevalent vertebral and nonvertebral fractures, and laboratory measures such as calcitropic hormones and bone turnover marker levels. This cross-sectional analysis consisted of 1705 community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over who participated in the baseline part of the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP), a population-based study of older men in Sydney, Australia. BMD at all sites was significantly higher among men with serum UA levels above the group median than among men with UA levels below the median. In multiple regression analyses adjusted for potential confounders, serum UA remained associated with BMD at all sites (β = 0.12 to 0.14, p < .001), serum calcium (β = 0.11, p = .001), parathyroid hormone (β = 0.09, p = .002), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (β = 0.09, p = .005), and was negatively associated with urinary excretion amino-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type 1 collagen (β = -0.09, p = .006). Overall, serum UA accounted for 1.0% to 1.44% of the variances in BMD (R(2)  = 0.10 to 0.22). In multiple logistic regression analyses, above-median serum UA levels were associated with a lower prevalence of osteoporosis at the femoral neck [odds ratio (OR) = 0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.81, p = .010) and lumbar spine (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.23-0.86, p = .016) and a lower prevalence of vertebral (OR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.43-0.91, p = .015) and nonvertebral (OR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.29-0.89, p = .018) fractures. In conclusion, higher serum UA levels are associated with higher BMD at all skeletal sites and with a lower prevalence of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures in older men.

PMID:
21541998
DOI:
10.1002/jbmr.286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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