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J Nat Med. 2011 Jul;65(3-4):544-50. doi: 10.1007/s11418-011-0538-6. Epub 2011 May 3.

Tinospora cordifolia attenuates oxidative stress and distorted carbohydrate metabolism in experimentally induced type 2 diabetes in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, 600116, India.

Abstract

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting a vast number of people worldwide. Oxidative stress is the causative agent amplifying diabetic complications in various organs by generating noxious amount of free radicals. A huge interest always exists in exploring nutraceuticals from plant materials to replace synthetic drugs in order to overcome their adverse effects and also for economic reasons. The anti-diabetic efficiency of a medicinal plant, Tinospora cordifolia (TC) was studied in experimentally induced type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats. Diabetes was induced by a combination of high fat diet (HFD) for a period of 10 weeks followed by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 35 mg/kg of body weight). Oral treatment of TC (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days regulated blood glucose, provoked insulin secretion and also suppressed oxidative stress marker, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), formation and restored cellular defence anti-oxidant markers including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione (GSH), in liver. Treatment with TC (100 and 200 mg/kg) also inhibited glucose 6-phosphatase and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (p < 0.001); and restored glycogen content in liver (p < 0.005), which was also studied by histopathological staining with periodic acid-Schiff stain. In conclusion, the traditional plant Tinospora cordifolia mediates its anti-diabetic potential through mitigating oxidative stress, promoting insulin secretion and also by inhibiting gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, thereby regulating blood glucose.

PMID:
21538233
DOI:
10.1007/s11418-011-0538-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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