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Am J Health Promot. 2011 May-Jun;25(5):310-8. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.080930-QUAN-228.

Effects of TV in the bedroom on young Hispanic children.

Author information

1
Texas Tech University, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, PO Box 41230, Lubbock, TX 79409-1230, USA. du.feng@ttu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The main purposes of this study were to assess TV viewing among Hispanic young children and to examine effects of having a TV in the child's bedroom (TVIB).

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate an intervention program that is collecting longitudinal data in West Texas. However, the current report uses only the baseline data of the ongoing study.

SUBJECTS:

Predominantly low-income and Hispanic parents/guardians (N=315) and their children of 5 to 9 years (N=597).

MEASURES:

Children's anthropometric measures were obtained. Their overweight status was determined based on age- and gender-adjusted body mass index. A demographic questionnaire, acculturation scale (brief version of Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans II), and family survey were used among parents.

ANALYSIS:

Descriptive statistics, t-tests, χ(2) tests, and logistic regressions were used.

RESULTS:

Most children (70%) have TVIB; more than 30% were or were at risk of overweight. Demographic characteristics did not significantly predict TVIB. Children with TVIB spent .93 hours more daily watching TV/DVD (t=3.07; df=283; p=.003), and children (at one site) ate more fast food (χ(2)=5.46; df=1; p=.019), compared with children without TVIB whose parents better supported physical activity (t=2.11; df=275; p=.039).

CONCLUSION:

Most children in this low-income and Hispanic sample have TVIB, which is associated with unhealthy behaviors.

PMID:
21534833
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.080930-QUAN-228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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