Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Health Psychol. 2011 Sep;30(5):651-5. doi: 10.1037/a0023006.

Independence centrality as a moderator of the effects of spousal support on patient well-being and physical functioning.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. lmm51@psu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we examined whether the benefits of spousal assistance for patient well-being and physical functioning depend on the fit between amount of assistance provided and the personal importance of completing activities independently.

METHODS:

Individuals with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee were assessed for independence centrality, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy for managing pain, and physical functioning (N = 159 to 230). Spouses reported the amount of support provided with daily tasks.

RESULTS:

As predicted, moderation analyses indicated that spousal support was associated with greater self-efficacy for managing pain in patients with low independence centrality, but was not associated with self-efficacy in patients with high independence centrality. Also consistent with our hypotheses, spousal support was associated with greater depressive symptoms and slower walk time in patients with high independence centrality, but there were no effects of spouse support on these outcomes for patients with low independence centrality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings demonstrate the implications of miscarried spousal support for patient well-being and physical functioning, and they suggest a means of tailoring couple-oriented interventions for chronic illness.

PMID:
21534676
PMCID:
PMC4100220
DOI:
10.1037/a0023006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Psychological Association Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center