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Am J Med. 2011 May;124(5):386-94. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2010.11.028.

Pulmonary disorders induced by monoclonal antibodies in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Laboratory of Autoimmune Diseases Josep Font, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a new class of agents causing drug-related pulmonary involvement in patients with systemic rheumatologic autoimmune diseases. The most frequently associated noninfectious pulmonary diseases are interstitial pneumonia (118 cases reported by August 2010), sarcoid-like disease and vasculitis (40 cases), and 97% of cases are associated with agents blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, granuloma formation, and maintenance. Drug-induced interstitial pneumonia has a poor prognosis, with an overall mortality rate of around one-third, rising to two-thirds in patients with pre-existing interstitial disease. Sarcoid-like disease has a better prognosis, with resolution or improvement in 90% of cases. Although the evidence comes overwhelmingly from case reports and case series, suggested recommendations for patient management include a detailed pre-therapeutic evaluation, early identification of symptoms suggestive of pulmonary disease, and tailored therapy. Mycobacterial infection should be exhaustively investigated, especially after anti-TNF administration. Large, prospective, postmarketing studies including nonbiological agents as controls may help elucidate the real risk of pulmonary disease in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases receiving monoclonal antibodies.

PMID:
21531225
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2010.11.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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