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Dig Liver Dis. 2011 Sep;43(9):714-20. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2011.03.003. Epub 2011 May 6.

Socio-geographical determinants of colonoscopy uptake after faecal occult blood test.

Author information

1
INSERM ERI3 Cancers & Populations, Faculté de Médecine, avenue de la Côte de Nacre, Caen, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Survival from colorectal cancer is poorer in patients of lower socioeconomic level, or living far from the cancer reference centre.

AIMS:

To evaluate the impact of material deprivation and geographical remoteness on the uptake of colonoscopy after a positive screening faecal occult blood test.

METHODS:

Data from two large French average-risk population-based trials comparing two faecal occult blood tests were used. Compliance with colonoscopy after a positive faecal occult blood test was analysed using a logistic model and a Cox model considering time between faecal occult blood test and colonoscopy. Covariates studied were sex, age, distance to nearest gastroenterologist, distance to regional capital, and Townsend's deprivation score.

RESULTS:

Amongst 4320 eligible subjects, 4131 were included. The rate of colonoscopy was 83.8%, within a median time of 66.0 days after faecal occult blood test. Distance to regional capital (p-trend=0.02) and study centre (p<0.0001) were independently associated with colonoscopy uptake. Time from positive faecal occult blood test to colonoscopy, was associated only with distance to the regional capital (p<0.0001, multivariate model stratified on study centre).

CONCLUSION:

Geographical remoteness but not material deprivation was responsible for lower uptake of colonoscopy. Healthcare decision-makers should focus on geographical remoteness to promote equal access to diagnostic procedures in faecal occult blood test colorectal cancer screening programmes.

PMID:
21530429
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2011.03.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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