Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Psychol Rep. 2011 Feb;108(1):95-103.

Relationships between self-regulation skills and physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption in obese adults: mediation of mood and self-efficacy.

Author information

1
YMCA of Metropolitan Atlanta, 100 Edgewood Avenue, NE, Suite 1100, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. jamesa@ymcaatlanta.org

Abstract

In cognitive-behavioral treatments for obesity, self-regulation is thought to be a strong predictor of behavioral change, but it is rarely directly measured in intervention research. Thus, how self-regulation interacts with other psychological variables regarding treatment effects is largely unknown. In this preliminary field study, self-regulatory skills were directly measured and were found to be significantly associated with both volume of exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption in severely obese adults (N=116) enrolled in a behavioral weight management program. Significant partial and complete mediation of the relationship between self-regulation for physical activity and physical activity, and self-regulation for appropriate eating and fruit and vegetable intake, respectively, were found by reported negative mood. Self-efficacy was not found to be a significant mediator of these relationships. The bivariate relationship between baseline scores of self-regulation for physical activity and self-regulation for appropriate eating was significant (r = .46), which supported the premise that self-regulation is a trait-like personal characteristic. Volume of exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption significantly predicted weight loss over 6 months (R2 = .35). Results were consistent with the few laboratory-based findings available and, after replication, may extend theory related to obesity treatment.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center